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Currently Viewing Events for:
"February"

February 1, 2014

Freedom Bound: Runaways of the Chesapeake

Freedom Bound: Runaways of the Chesapeake is a story of resistance to servitude and slavery in the Chesapeake region. The exhibit begins in the 1720s, during the colonial period, and ends in the 1860s amidst the nation’s Civil War. You will meet people who were treated as property, and discover how they resisted that condition and asserted some degree of control over their lives and circumstances. Video, historic artifacts, actual runaway advertisements dating from 1728-1864, hands-on activities, mannequins and reproduction clothing will all help to tell the story of real people who struggled for freedom. The exhibit runs through March 2, 2014. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday, 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Portions of the exhibit will also be on display at the Historic Annapolis Waterfront Warehouse, 4 Pinkney Street and Banneker-Douglass Museum, 84 Franklin Street.

Location:
Historic Annapolis Museum
99 Main Street
Annapolis, MD 21401
Contact Info:
(410) 267-7619

February 4, 2014 @ 7:30pm

Beyond Slavery: Frederick Douglass and the Quest for Universal Rights

This conversation will feature writer and educator Colum McCann who will be joined by University of Maryland professors Ira Berlin, Patrick O’Shea and Professor Emerita Lee Thornton to explore the influence Douglass had on religious freedom, gender issues and slavery. Moderated by WAMU talk show host Kojo Nnamdi, the Creative Dialogues series invites you to join the conversation. Event is free; no RSVP required.

Location:
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742
Contact Info:
Clarice Smith Center Box Office
301-405-2787

February 5, 2014 @ 7:00pm

"Voices of the Indiantown" Film Screening

The Nanticoke Historic Preservation Alliance will present its documentary film, "Voices of the Indiantown," which tells the history of the African American families who sharecropped in the Indiantown area around the Handsell plantation in Dorchester County, Maryland.

Location:
Edward H. Nabb Research Center, Salisbury University
1101 Camden Ave.
Salisbury, MD 21801
Contact Info:
Nanticoke Historic Preservation Alliance
410-543-6312

February 5, 2014 @ 11:30am

Trayvon Martin Moments

Baltimore native and nationally known actress, Maria Broom will present a short performance. Following the performance, community members are invited to participate in a dialogue led by humanities scholar Kalima Young reflecting on the Trayvon Martin incident and gun violence.

Location:
Our Daily Bread Homeless Center
725 Fallsway
Baltimore, MD 21202
Contact Info:
Rosiland Cauthen
803-246-8854

February 6, 2014 @ 6:00pm

Charles Ball: A Living History Presentation

Vincent Leggett portrays Charles Ball, a third-generation slave from Calvert County, Maryland who, after being sold to a trader in the deep South, escaped back to his home state. Upon his return to Maryland, he acted as a free man and fought in the War of 1812 on behalf of the United States in Commodore Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla. He took part in some of the most exciting battles in the Chesapeake, including the march from Benedict to Bladensburg and the defense of Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. Ball was discharged in 1814 and published an autobiography, The Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, in 1837. Ball’s story provides a lens through which we can examine the legacy of blacks in the Chesapeake, including their role in the War of 1812.Vincent Leggett is founder of the Blacks of the Chesapeake Foundation (1984) and the Chesapeake Ecology Center (2002). He has held positions at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anne Arundel Community College, Anne Arundel County and Baltimore City Public Schools, and he currently serves as Executive Director of the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis. Mr. Leggett is the author of The Chesapeake Bay Through Ebony Eyes (1999) and Blacks of the Chesapeake: An Integral Part of Maritime History (1997). He has also developed a curriculum on the Blacks of the Chesapeake, which is used by school systems in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and the District of Columbia.

Location:
Talbot County Free Library
100 West Dover Street
Easton, MD 21601
Contact Info:
Sabine Simonson
410-822-1626

February 6, 2014 @ 6:30pm

"Choosing Sides": Making Sense of the American Civil War

“Choosing Sides”: Dr. Michael Bunitsky, Curriculum Specialist for Social Studies 6-12 at Frederick County Public Schools, will speak on Maryland’s actions in 1861 when the State Legislature was moved to Frederick to control the decision to secede or not to secede. A related Civil War walking tour of downtown Frederick will be offered on Saturday, 15 February 2014, at 5:30 PM Location: Urbana Regional Library, Frederick County Public Libraries

Location:
Urbana Regional Library
9020 Amelung Street
Frederick, MD 21704
Contact Info:
Mary Mannix

February 6, 2014 @ 7:00pm

Trayvon Martin Moments

Jasmine Pope will present a short performance. Following the performance, community members are invited to participate in a dialogue led by humanities scholar Dayvon Love reflecting on the Trayvon Martin incident and gun violence.

Location:
New Era Academy - Cherry Hill
2700 Seamon Avenue
Brooklyn, MD 21225
Contact Info:
Rosiland Cauthen
803-246-8854

February 7, 2014 @ 7:00pm

Trayvon Martin Moments

Bashi Rose and Troy Burton will present a short performance. Following the performance, community members are invited to participate in a dialogue led by humanities scholar Dr. Raymond Winbush reflecting on the Trayvon Martin incident and gun violence.

Location:
Seventh Metro Baptist Church
30 E. North Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21202
Contact Info:
Rosiland Cauthen
803-246-8854

February 8, 2014 @ 2:00pm

The Stories of Everyday People in the War of 1812

When war came to the shores of the Chesapeake, what was it like for everyday citizens and local militiamen, as well as slaves, freedmen, women? Mike Dixon reveals unpublished stories of unrepresented peoples such as slaves and African-Americans, and the narratives of everyday people who aren’t talked about in the history books. Middle school, high school, and adult audiences. Mike Dixon is an adjunct professor at the University of Delaware and other area colleges where he concentrates on social history with a focus on mass media and criminal justice. He is the historian for Town of Elkton and The Historical Society of Cecil County, and he has provided start-up leadership in the development of a 62-acre living history museum in Cecil County. Mike received his M.A. in history from Washington College, his M.S. in Training and Organizational Development from St. Joseph’s University, and his B.A. in Behavioral Science from Wilmington College.

Location:
Calvert Library Prince Frederick
850 Costley Way
Prince Frederick, MD 20678
Contact Info:
Mike Dixon
410-535-0291

February 8, 2014 @ 1:00pm

Charles Ball: A Living History Presentation

Vincent Leggett portrays Charles Ball, a third-generation slave from Calvert County, Maryland who, after being sold to a trader in the deep South, escaped back to his home state. Upon his return to Maryland, he acted as a free man and fought in the War of 1812 on behalf of the United States in Commodore Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla. He took part in some of the most exciting battles in the Chesapeake, including the march from Benedict to Bladensburg and the defense of Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. Ball was discharged in 1814 and published an autobiography, The Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, in 1837. Ball’s story provides a lens through which we can examine the legacy of blacks in the Chesapeake, including their role in the War of 1812. Vincent Leggett is founder of the Blacks of the Chesapeake Foundation (1984) and the Chesapeake Ecology Center (2002). He has held positions at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anne Arundel Community College, Anne Arundel County and Baltimore City Public Schools, and he currently serves as Executive Director of the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis. Mr. Leggett is the author of The Chesapeake Bay Through Ebony Eyes (1999) and Blacks of the Chesapeake: An Integral Part of Maritime History (1997). He has also developed a curriculum on the Blacks of the Chesapeake, which is used by school systems in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and the District of Columbia.

Location:
Historic Sotterley Plantation
44300 Sotterley Lane
Hollywood, MD 20636
Contact Info:
Jeanne Pirtle
301-373-2280

February 8, 2014 @ 10:30am

“Researching Maryland’s Civil War: A Beginners Guide”

8 February 2014, 10:30 AM – 12 noon “Researching Maryland’s Civil War: A Beginners Guide” An overview of the sources available in the FCPL Maryland Room for anyone beginning to investigate a Civil War topic, whether for fun or scholarship. There will also be some discussion of on-line resources. Mary Mannix, Maryland Room Manager Location: Maryland Room, C. Burr Artz Public Library, Frederick County Public Library

Location:
Maryland Room, C. Burr Artz Public Library, Frederick County Public Libraries
110 East Patrick Street
Frederick, MD 21701
Contact Info:
Mary Mannix

February 8, 2014 @ 7:00pm

Trayvon Martin Moments

Kwame Shaka Opare and Baltimore City Youth Poetry Team will present a short performance. Following the performance, community members are invited to participate in a dialogue led by humanities scholar Zeke Cohen of Intersections Baltimore reflecting on the Trayvon Martin incident and gun violence.

Location:
Towanda Recreation Center
4100 Towanda Ave.
Park Heights, MD 21215
Contact Info:
Rosiland Cauthen
803-2456-8854

February 9, 2014 @ 2:00pm

"Voices of the Indiantown" Film Screening

The Nanticoke Historic Preservation Alliance will present its documentary film, "Voices of the Indiantown," which tells the history of the African American families who sharecropped in the Indiantown area around the Handsell plantation in Dorchester County, Maryland.

Location:
Robbins Heritage Center, Dorchester County Historical Society
1003 Greenway Dr.
Cambridge, MD 21613
Contact Info:
Nanticoke Historic Preservation Alliance
410-228-7953

February 9, 2014 @ 5:00pm

Trayvon Martin Moments

Staged Readings from Facing Our Truth: 10 Minute Plays on Trayvon, Race, and Privilege, plays commissioned by Keith Josef Adkins and The New Black Fest and written by six diverse national playwrights, including Dominique Morisseau and Marcus Gardley, inspired to ignite serious community discussions. For more information email education@centerstage.org

Location:
Center Stage
700 Calvert Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Contact Info:
Rosiland Cauthen
410-986-4050

February 10, 2014 @ 7:00pm

Fighting Old Nep: The Food Culture of Enslaved Afro-Americans

Beginning with Mathias de Sousa, the first African to arrive in Maryland in the 1600s, this presentation traces three centuries of African American culinary history from specific West and Central African civilizations to colonial Maryland. Incorporating music, historical narratives, and authentic foods, Twitty illustrates the vast influence of both enslaved and free black people on the cuisine and culture of the New World. The presentation also explores the influences Native Americans and Europeans had on Maryland foodways that were later adapted by other parts of the country. Adult and high school audiences. Michael Twitty is Director of Interpretation for the Menare Foundation and a Hebrew School instructor for four congregations in Montgomery County. He has given presentations on African American and Jewish food traditions at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, the Library of Congress, American University, and at museums and historic sites in the Washington, DC area. Michael also published a blog, Afroculinaria, which explores cultural traditions of Africa, African Americans, and the African Diaspora. He is completing his B.A. in African American Studies and Anthropology at Howard University. He is the author of Fighting Old Nep: The Foodways of Enslaved Afro-Marylanders 1634-1864.

Location:
Washington County Free Library
100 S. Potomac St.
Hagerstown, MD 21740
Contact Info:
Patricia Wishard
301-739-3250 x163

February 13, 2014 @ 7:00pm

Making Sense of Shiloh

The third discussion will be on the theme, "Making Sense of Shiloh," the book discussed will be "America's War" part three.

Location:
Carroll Lutheran Village, Krug Chapel
205 St. Mark Way
Westminster, MD 21157
Contact Info:
Lynn Glaeser
443-605-1028

February 13, 2014 @ 7:00pm

Imagining War

The third discussion will be held on the theme, "Making Sense of Shiloh." "America's War" part 3, by Edward Ayers will be discussed. It will be led by Dr. Bryn Upton, Associate Professor, U.S. History at McDaniel College.

Location:
Fairhaven
7200 Third Avenue #1000
Sykesville, MD 21784
Contact Info:
Buzz Baker
410-795-8801

February 15, 2014 @ 10:00am

Broken Relationships

Further discussion from the “March” book will focus on the relationships in families and how the War specifically affected those relationships. The effects of the traumas and how families dealt with the aftermath of these traumas.

Location:
Garrett College Continuing Education Rm. 201
687 Mosser Road
McHenry, Md 21541
Contact Info:
Mary Callis
(301) 387-3082

February 15, 2014 @ 5:30pm

Civil War Walking Tour

Civil War walking tour of downtown Frederick.

Location:
Urbana Regional Library
9020 Amelung Street
Frederick, MD 21704
Contact Info:
Mary Mannix

February 19, 2014 @ 6:30pm

Making Sense of Shiloh

Gail Stephens, author of "Shadow of Shiloh: Major General Lew Wallace in the Civil War," will speak. Shiloh was the first great bloody battle of the Civil War. It had a profound impact upon the course of the Civil War, and upon U. S. Grant, who led the Union to victory, and Lew Wallace, who commanded the Union force at the Battle of Monocacy.

Location:
Urbana Regional Library
9020 Amelung Street
Frederick, MD 21704
Contact Info:
Mary Mannix

February 19, 2014 @ 11:30am

Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade

Luncheon, Keynote Lecture, Discussion and Book Signing by Thomas Norman DeWolf and Sharon Leslie Morgan. Meet the authors, hear about the journey toward racial reconciliation made by DeWolf (a white man who descended from the largest slave-trading dynasty in U.S. history) and Morgan (a black woman who descended from slaves on both sides of her family)and discuss ways that their story offers a model for healing in local communities.

Location:
Harford Community College - Student Center Room 243
401 Thomas Run Rd.
Bel Air, MD 21015
Contact Info:
Linda Anthony
443-412-2539

February 19, 2014 @ 1:00pm

Faces of Freedom Exhibition Opening Reception

Join the Hays-Heighe House for a reception celebrating the opening of the exhibition "Faces of Freedom: The Upper Chesapeake, Maryland, and Beyond." The exhibit commemorates the 150th anniversary of the adoption of the Maryland Constitution of 1864 which ended slavery in the state. The project will focus on freedom, slavery and emancipation before, during and after the Civil War. Regular exhibit hours are Tuesdays from 1 to 3pm, Fridays from 10am to 12pm, and first Saturdays from 10am to 12pm. The exhibit will be on view from February 19 to May 10, 2014.

Location:
Hays- Heighe House - Harford Community College
401 Thomas Run Rd.
Bel Air, MD 21015
Contact Info:
Linda Anthony
443-412-2539

February 20, 2014 @ 1:00pm

An Imagined Civil War: Civil War Fiction

Anne Sarah Rubin leads the Jewish Museum’s second book program as she discusses the Pulitzer Prize winning “March” by Geraldine Brooks. The conversation will consider the relationship between March and Little Women, some of the biographical connections to Louisa May Alcott, and the way in which the novel reflects an alternative Civil War experience. Register for this talk today. Copies of the book are available and can be borrowed at no cost from the Museum. Register now with Trillion Attwood tattwood@jewishmuseummd.org or 410-732-6400 ext.215 Anne Sarah Rubin is an Associate Professor of History and Director of the Center for Digital History and Education at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She received her AB from Princeton University and her MA and PhD from the University of Virginia. Dr. Rubin is currently President of the Society of Civil War Historians.

Location:
Enoch Pratt Free Library
1251 Light Street
Baltimore, MD 21230
Contact Info:
Trillion Attwood
(410) 732-6400 ext 215

February 20, 2014 @ 1:00pm

March on Washington

August 28, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, when over 200,000 people peacefully demonstrated in the nation’s capital for civil rights and economic equality. The event, in the centennial year of the Emancipation Proclamation, featured speeches and performances by well-known civil rights leaders and included the famous “I Have a Dream” speech delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the Lincoln Memorial. The March on Washington had an important impact on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Using stories, historical photographs, and song, Gwendolyn Briley-Strand brings this significant period in civil rights history to life. A question and answer session follows the presentation. Adult and high school audiences. Gwendolyn Briley-Strand has been delighting audiences on stage, television, and in movie theatres for over twenty years. She is known for her portrayals of Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, and Rosa Parks. In 1991 and 1992 Ms. Briley-Strand was invited to bring Harriet Tubman to the White House for the Fourth of July Celebration. She has also portrayed Harriet Tubman at the Smithsonian, the Kennedy Center, and museums and cultural organizations. She received her B.A. in theater from Fordham University and is a member of the Screen Actors Guild, Actors Equity Association, and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. More information about Ms. Briley-Strand can be found on her website at www.seethefruits.com.

Location:
Riggs Alumni Center, Orum Hall
University of Maryland College Park 20742
College Park, MD 20742
Contact Info:
Christine Garcia
301-314-7552

February 22, 2014 @ 11:00am

Music of the Civil War Era

At the outset of the Civil War the hopes and aspirations of both North and South were echoed in music full of pride, determination, confidence, and even arrogance. Yet as the horrors unfold and time drags on, the music turns more towards thoughts of home and peace and the end of conflict. Join Dr. David Hildebrand for a musical survey full of familiar tunes with the fascinating stories behind them -- from John Brown's Harper's Ferry raid to "The Bonnie White Flag." Appearing in period costume, Dr. Hildebrand will perform musical selections of the time accompanied by guitar, banjo, flute and voice (a piano is requested but not essential). Appropriate images may be shown if a projector and screen are available. Adult and family audiences. David Hildebrand teaches American music history at the Peabody Conservatory, and he is finishing a history of music in Maryland for The Johns Hopkins University Press. He and his wife Ginger Hildebrand have been performing professionally for museums, historical societies, schools, colleges, and universities throughout the country since 1980, focusing on American music. Dr. Hildebrand received his Ph.D. in Musicology from Catholic University of America, his M.A. in Musicology from George Washington University, and his B.A. in Music from Dickinson College.

Location:
Eldersburg Public Library
6400 W. Hemlock Drive
Eldersburg, MD 21784
Contact Info:
Christine Kirker
410-386-4460

February 22, 2014 @ 1:00pm

The Olde Storyteller

Bill Grimmette transforms himself into three iconic figures reflecting different eras in American history – Frederick Douglass (Civil War), WEB Du Bois (Human Rights), and Martin Luther King Jr.(Civil Rights). These intrepid characters will tell the story of their contributions to the American Dream that made our nation the envy of the world. Using minimal pieces of period costumes, Grimmette will delight and inspire audiences with powerful stories that bring history to life.

Location:
Harford County Public Library, Edgewood Branch
629 Edgewood Road
Edgewood, MD 20140
Contact Info:
Patty McAllister-Shakeshaft
410-612-1601

February 22, 2014 @ 10:30am

"Finding Your Civil War Ancestor"

“Finding Your Civil War Ancestor” An introduction to researching mid-19th century genealogy, special emphasis will be placed on how to locate your ancestors who served in the Civil War, Confederate or Union. Mary Mannix, Maryland Room Manager Location: Maryland Room, C. Burr Artz Public Library, Frederick County Public Libraries

Location:
Maryland Room, C. Burr Artz Public Library, Frederick County Public Libraries
110 East Patrick Street
Frederick, MD 21701
Contact Info:
Mary Mannix

February 22, 2014 @ 10:00am

Emancipation Proclamation

The battle of Antietam provided the opportunity for Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. Our conversation will focus on the genius of his strategy and the impact it had on the common solider.

Location:
Garrett College Continuing Education Rm. 201
687 Mosser Road
McHenry, MD 21541
Contact Info:
Mary Callis
(301) 387-3082

February 23, 2014 @ 3:00pm

Dr. Sidney Hart- The War of 1812 through the lens of Portraiture and Images

Dr. Hart is the Senior Historian at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and co-editor of the Peale Family Papers, "The Selected Papers of Charles Wilson Peale and His Family, 5 volumes." He recently curated the National Portrait Gallery exhibit "1812: A National Emerges" and co-authored the exhibit's catalogue of the same title.

Location:
College of Southern Maryland, Prince Frederick Campus, New Auditorium
115 J.W. Williams Road
Prince Frederick, MD 20678
Contact Info:
Valerie Giroux
410-326-2042 x17

February 23, 2014 @ 1:00pm

Sandie B. Feldman Family Lecture: Kaddish For Lincoln

By tradition, Abraham Lincoln was the first American gentile for whom Jews said Kaddish--the Hebrew prayer for the dead. The story may approach the realm of legend, but reverence for Lincoln among many Jews of his time was real, and the mass national mourning after his assassination reached not only the church but the synagogue. In this discussion of Jewish attitudes toward Lincoln--and Lincoln's evolving attitude toward Jews, Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer explores the 16th president's legal decisions and personal attitudes on Jews and Jewish issues during the Civil War, and assesses whether the Great Emancipator deserved the name many contemporaries gave to him in the 19th Century: American Moses. Harold Holzer is Chairman of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation, official successor organization of the U. S. Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. REGISTRATION REQUIRED.

Location:
The Jewish Museum of Maryland
15 Llyod Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Contact Info:
Trillion Attwood
(410) 732-6400 x 215

February 26, 2014 @ 2:00pm

The Abolitionists: Film Screening & Discussion by Wayne Hepler, M.S.

View and discuss this 2013 PBS documentary written, produced and directed by Rob Rapley, which tells the intertwined stories of Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Angelina Grimke, Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Brown. Supported also by a "Created Equal" grant from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the National Endowment for the Humanities through the Bridging Cultures program. Seating is limited and reservations are recommended; see contact information below.

Location:
Harford Community College - Joppa Hall Room 115
401 Thomas Run Rd.
Bel Air, MD 21015
Contact Info:
Linda Anthony
443-412-2539

February 27, 2014 @ 7:00pm

War of 1812 on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland

Most Marylanders know that during the War of 1812 Francis Scott Key, inspired by the bombardment of Fort McHenry, wrote the lyrics to a song that later became our national anthem. But how many Marylanders ever heard of the Battle of Caulk’s Field, the Battle of Slippery Hill, or the Battle of the Ice Mound? How many know that no other state in the Union suffered more British raids than Maryland, that some of the best preserved earthworks from the war are located here, or that Maryland has identified over 400 sites related to the War of 1812? This illustrated talk explores the role that Maryland played in this little understood war and examines the vast resource base that survives, including actual battlefield and raid sites, monuments, and even graves of war veterans. Maryland has a War of 1812 heritage that is largely unknown, under-appreciated, and in some cases threatened. Adult audiences. This event is free. Ralph Eshelman has over 30 years of cultural resource management experience. He was co-director of the Patuxent River Cultural Resource Survey which discovered and partially excavated an American War of 1812 military vessel from the U.S. Chesapeake Flotilla. He also conducted a holistic inventory of War of 1812 and Revolutionary War sites in Maryland for the National Park Service’s National Battlefield Protection Program. He served as the historian for the “Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail” Study Team of the National Park Service. Eshelman is senior author of The War of 1812 in the Chesapeake: A Guide to the Historic Sites of Maryland, Virginia and District of Columbia as well as the author of A Travel Guide to the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake: Eighteen Tours in Maryland, Virginia, & the District of Columbia and Maryland’s Largest Naval Engagement: The Battles of St. Leonard Creek, 1814, Calvert County, Maryland. Eshelman's most recent book, co-authored with Burt Kummerow, is titled In Full Glory Reflected: Discovering the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake.

Location:
St. Andrew's Parish House
30513 Washington Street
Princess Anne, MD 21853
Contact Info:
Warner Sumpter
443-497-9253

February 27, 2014 @ 7:00pm

The Shape of War

The fourth discussion will be held on the theme "The Shape of War." The books discussed will be "Crossroads of Freedom" by James McPherson and "America's War" Part 4 by Edward Ayers.

Location:
Carroll Lutheran Village, Krug Chapel
205 St. Mark Way
Westminster, MD 21157
Contact Info:
Lynn Glaeser, Carroll Lutheran Village
443-605-1028

February 27, 2014 @ 7:00pm

Choosing Sides

The fourth discussion will explore the theme of "the Shape of War." "Crossroads of Freedom" and "America's War" part 4, will be discussed. The program will be led by Dr. Bryn Upton, Associate Professor of U.S. history at McDaniel College.

Location:
Fairhaven
7200 Third Avenue #1000
Sykesville, MD 21784
Contact Info:
Buzz Baker
410-795-8801

February 27, 2014 @ 12:30pm

Charles Ball: A Living History Presentation

Vincent Leggett portrays Charles Ball, a third-generation slave from Calvert County, Maryland who, after being sold to a trader in the deep South, escaped back to his home state. Upon his return to Maryland, he acted as a free man and fought in the War of 1812 on behalf of the United States in Commodore Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla. He took part in some of the most exciting battles in the Chesapeake, including the march from Benedict to Bladensburg and the defense of Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. Ball was discharged in 1814 and published an autobiography, The Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, in 1837. Ball’s story provides a lens through which we can examine the legacy of blacks in the Chesapeake, including their role in the War of 1812.Vincent Leggett is founder of the Blacks of the Chesapeake Foundation (1984) and the Chesapeake Ecology Center (2002). He has held positions at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anne Arundel Community College, Anne Arundel County and Baltimore City Public Schools, and he currently serves as Executive Director of the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis. Mr. Leggett is the author of The Chesapeake Bay Through Ebony Eyes (1999) and Blacks of the Chesapeake: An Integral Part of Maritime History (1997). He has also developed a curriculum on the Blacks of the Chesapeake, which is used by school systems in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and the District of Columbia.

Location:
Pascal Senior Center
125 Dorsey Road
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
Contact Info:
Nancy Allred
410-222--6680

February 28, 2014 @ 10:30am

The Stories of Everyday People in the War of 1812

When war came to the shores of the Chesapeake, what was it like for everyday citizens and local militiamen, as well as slaves, freedmen, women? Mike Dixon reveals unpublished stories of unrepresented peoples such as slaves and African-Americans, and the narratives of everyday people who aren’t talked about in the history books. Mike Dixon is an adjunct professor at the University of Delaware and other area colleges where he concentrates on social history with a focus on mass media and criminal justice. He is the historian for Town of Elkton and The Historical Society of Cecil County, and he has provided start-up leadership in the development of a 62-acre living history museum in Cecil County. Mike received his M.A. in history from Washington College, his M.S. in Training and Organizational Development from St. Joseph’s University, and his B.A. in Behavioral Science from Wilmington College.

Location:
Belair Mansion
12207 Tulip Grove Drive
Bowie, MD 20715
Contact Info:
Pam Williams
301-809-3089

February 28, 2014 @ 12:30pm

All Different Kinds of Free and Prigg v. Pennsylvania: Slavery, the Supreme Court and the Ambivalent Constitution

Debra Newman Ham, Ph.D. will lead a paired book discussion focusing on Jessica Mccann's historical novel about the heart-breaking story of Margaret Morgan, kidnapped from her home in Pennsylvania in 1837 and sold into slavery. Also, learn about the constitutional issues involved in the Supreme Court case that determined her fate and sowed the seeds of the states' rights battle that eventually led to the Civil War, as analyzed by Robert H. Baker. Seating is limited and registration is required. To reserve a seat and to purchase a copy of the books at a discount, see the contact information below.

Location:
Hays-Heighe House Room 201 - Harford Community College
401 Thomas Run Rd.
Bel Air, MD 21015
Contact Info:
Linda Anthony
443-412-2539