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Currently Viewing Events for:
"February"

February 5, 2013 @ 7:00pm

Civil War Book Discussion: "America's War Anthology" - Part Two

This is a five-part reading and discussion series, Making Sense of the Civil War, sponsored in part by the Maryland Humanities Council. Loaner copies of the book are available on a first-come, first-serve basis in the La Plata Campus library. Discussions continue with the conflict that is presented when the Confederacy and the Union are formed and Americans experience a split in beliefs and loyalties. Abolitionists, including the March family from Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women,” encourage Frederick Douglass to make a speech on their behalf but Douglass gives them more than they asked for by stripping away any illusions white Americans may have had about their innocence, confronting them directly with the hypocrisy of a nation dedicated to freedom and built on slavery. Abraham Lincoln attempts to restore division as he is elected into presidency; Robert E. Lee embodies the agony of disunion and Mark Twain tells of his own wayward path in the confusing early days of the war. Free.

Location:
The College of Southern Maryland, La Plata Campus
Center for Business & Industry, BI-113E. 8730 Mitchell Road
La Plata, MD 20646
Contact Info:
(301) 934-7606

February 5, 2013 @ 6:30pm

Making Sense of the Civil War Discussion Featuring Mike Dixon

In commemoration of the 150th Anniversary, Making Sense of the American Civil War is a reading and discussion series that explores literary works about the Civil War. Discuss the book "March" by Geraldine Brooks and readings from "America's War: Talking About the Civil War and Emancipation on Their 150th Anniversaries," an anthology by Edward Ayers. The discussion will feature historian and MHC Speakers Bureau scholar Mike Dixon.

Location:
Wicomico Public Library, Main Branch
122 South Division Street
Salisbury, MD 21801
Contact Info:
Mindy Mallette
(410) 749-3612 x 138

February 6, 2013 @ 6:00pm

W.E.B. DuBois: A Living History Presentation

W.E.B. Du Bois was a scholar and political activist whose work interpreted the role of blacks in the critical period from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights movement. The first African American to receive a doctorate from Harvard, Du Bois helped found the NAACP and its magazine The Crisis. In this costumed, living history presentation, Bill Grimmette portrays Du Bois, and engages the audience in a discussion of the scholar's legacy. Adult and high school audiences. Bill Grimmette is a living history interpreter, storyteller, actor, and motivational speaker who has performed throughout the United States and abroad. He has researched and performed the characters of W. E. B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Banneker, Estevanico, and Augustus Washington. He has appeared at the Smithsonian Institution and on National Public Radio. He has an M.A. in psychology from the Catholic University of America, and has done post-graduate work in education at George Mason University.

Location:
Enoch Pratt Free Library
6310 Reisterstown Road
Baltimore, MD 21228
Contact Info:
Rebecca Hass
410-396-0948

February 7, 2013 @ 6:00pm

Civil War Book Discussion

In commemoration of the 150th Anniversary, Making Sense of the American Civil War is a reading and discussion series that explores literary works about the Civil War. Copies of the selected texts are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Pick up your reading materials and take a tour of Hampton National Historic Shrine. To register for this free program, contact Ranger Jim Bailey at jim_bailey@nps.gov or call 410-962-4290 Ext. 206.

Location:
Hampton National Historic Shrine
535 Hampton Lane
Towson, MD 21286
Contact Info:
Ranger Jim Bailey
(410) 962-4290 ext 206 or email jim_bailey@nps.gov

February 8, 2013 @ 7:00pm

The Musical Stories of Journeys

Listen to the ballads and songs that tell the stories of American journeys throughout our nation. Sailors and commercial fishermen travel the rivers and lakes singing shanties and ballads of longing for home. Political candidates go town to town, accompanied by bands and choruses performing their theme songs. Woody Guthrie sets the complaints of migrant workers to old, familiar tunes. The Civil War displaces soldiers into regions never seen, and of course the journeys of those who come from foreign lands to the US as the land of opportunity bring their native tunes with them, then learn to sing here of their new experiences. Cowboy, Indian, colonist, slave, traveling salesman, homesteader, dust bowl escapee, vaudeville performer, gold-digger, Vietnam refugee – there are songs for all of them. Dr. Hildebrand (whose own family traditions keep alive a song about "Aunt Becky" falling out of her bunk on a houseboat trip in Florida, 40 years ago) offers a mixture of mostly live musical selections, plus some recorded, accompanied by appropriate images. Adult and high school audiences.

Location:
College of Southern Maryland, Building A Auditorium
22950 Hollywood Road
Leonardtown, MD 20650
Contact Info:
Keith Hight
301-934-7827

February 8, 2013 @ 12:00pm

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights

A dynamic project in which a dozen senior citizens from the Baltimore area tell and perform personal stories of their involvement in the struggle for civil rights.

Location:
Baltimore City Hall
100 N. Holiday Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Contact Info:
Sandra Abbott
(410) 455-3188 or visit www.foralltheworldtohear.org

February 8, 2013 @ 7:00pm

Making Sense of the Civil War Discussion, Part 2

A discussion based on Edward Ayers Anthology, "America's War: Talking About the Civil War & Emancipation on Their 150th Anniversaries." Park Ranger, historian, and author John Hptak will lead the discussion.

Location:
Boonsboro Branch Library
104 Potomac Street
Boonsboro, MD 21713
Contact Info:
Patricia Wishard
(301) 739-3250 x 186

February 10, 2013 @ 2:00pm

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights

A dynamic project in which a dozen senior citizens from the Baltimore area tell and perform personal stories of their involvement in the struggle for civil rights.

Location:
Jewish Museum of Maryland
15 Lloyd Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Contact Info:
Sandra Abbott
(410) 455-3188 or visit www.foralltheworldtohear.org

February 11, 2013 @ 7:00pm

Film: Green Fire, Aldo Leopold, and the Land Ethic for Our Time

Film with panel and world cafe discussion.

Location:
Allegany College of Maryland
12401 Willowbrook Road
Cumberland, MD 21502
Contact Info:
Mike Snyder
(240) 522-1479

February 11, 2013 @ 6:30pm

Fighting For Freedom: Black Women's Army Corps During World War II

For the first time during World War II, African-American women were allowed to enter the military. The first contingent trained in Fort Des Moines, Iowa, where they were housed in segregated barracks, ate at separate dining tables, and used segregated recreational facilities. Despite the hardships and discrimination, the women persevered and thirty-six of the original group graduated and were assigned to Officers Candidate School, Cooks and Bakers School, the Transportation Pool, or the Clerical School. A lecture by Janet Sims-Wood discusses the courageous example set by the first African-American WAC unit in Europe. Janet Sims-Wood is former Assistant Chief Librarian in the Reference/Reader Services Department at the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University. She has also taught at the University of Maryland in the Afro American Studies Department. Dr. Sims-Wood received her B.A. in Sociology from North Carolina Central University, her M.L.S. from the University of Maryland, and her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies/History/Oral History from Union Institute Graduate School.

Location:
Harford County Public Library, Edgewood Branch
629 Edgewood Road
Edgewood , MD 21040
Contact Info:
Patty McAllister-Shakeshaft
410-612-1600

February 12, 2013 @ 6:00pm

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights

A dynamic project in which a dozen senior citizens from the Baltimore area tell and perform personal stories of their involvement in the struggle for civil rights.

Location:
Maryland Historical Society
201 W. Monument Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
Contact Info:
Sandra Abbott
(410) 455-3188 or visit www.foralltheworldtohear.org

February 13, 2013 @ 12:00pm

Frederick Douglass: A Living History Presentation

One of the leaders of America's abolitionist movement, Frederick Douglass was born into slavery in Talbot County, Maryland in 1817. As a young house servant, he was taught to read and write. The brutality he experienced as a slave eventually led him to escape North and in 1845 he published his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. A noted speaker, Douglass influenced such important figures as Abraham Lincoln. Bill Grimmette is a living history interpreter, storyteller, actor, and motivational speaker who has performed throughout the United States and abroad. He has researched and performed the characters of W. E. B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Banneker, Estevanico, and Augustus Washington. He has appeared at the Smithsonian Institution and on National Public Radio. He has an M.A. in psychology from the Catholic University of America, and has done post-graduate work in education at George Mason University.

Location:
Elkridge Senior Center
6540 Washington Boulevard
Elkridge, MD 21075
Contact Info:
Jeanne Slater
410-313-5192

February 14, 2013 @ 7:00pm

Margaret Brent of Maryland

In this Living History Presentation, Mary Ann Jung portrays Margaret Brent, who was the first woman in America to ask for the vote. In a costumed, living history presentation, Mary Ann Jung portrays this outspoken and educated woman and gives an account of life and society in early seventeenth century Maryland. Adult and high school audiences.

Location:
Annapolis Maritime Museum
723 Second Street
Annapolis, MD 21403
Contact Info:
Debra Stafford
410-295-0104

February 15, 2013 @ 10:30am

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights

A dynamic project in which a dozen senior citizens from the Baltimore area tell and perform personal stories of their involvement in the struggle for civil rights.

Location:
UMBC, Recital Hall
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
Contact Info:
Sandra Abbott
(410) 455-3188 or visit www.foralltheworldtohear.org

February 15, 2013 @ 7:00pm

The Murder of Abraham Lincoln

In commemoration of the 150th Anniversary, Making Sense of the American Civil War is a reading and discussion series that explores literary works about the Civil War. Join participants in a presentation by Roger Arthur on the conspiracy to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln.

Location:
Wicomico Public Library, Main Branch
122 South Division Street
Salisbury, MD 21801
Contact Info:
Mindy Mallette
(410) 749-3612 x 138

February 16, 2013 @ 10:30am

The Mason-Dixon Line: The Story Behind a Geographic Boundary

The Mason-Dixon Line is seen by many as a symbolic dividing line for regional attitudes and customs. Because of a bitter territorial dispute over royal land grants, the Mason-Dixon Line was surveyed between 1763 and 1767 to settle the boundaries for Pennsylvania and Maryland. After 1820, when the Missouri Compromise created political conditions which made the line important to the history of slavery, it became associated with the division between the free and slave states. This program seeks to generate a discussion about how, centuries later, the Mason-Dixon still holds our imagination as a geographic boundary that is also a dividing point for political, social and cultural values. Mike Dixon is an adjunct professor at the University of Delaware and other area colleges where he concentrates on social history with a focus on mass media and criminal justice. He is the historian for Town of Elkton and The Historical Society of Cecil County, and he has provided start-up leadership in the development of a 62-acre living history museum in Cecil County. Mike received his M.A. in history from Washington College, his M.S. in Training and Organizational Development from St. Joseph’s University, and his B.A. in Behavioral Science from Wilmington College.

Location:
Frederick Community College Conference Center
7932 Opossumtown Pike
Frederick, MD 21702
Contact Info:
Liz Shatto
301-600-4042

February 16, 2013 @ 9:30am

Frederick Douglass, Slavery, Abolitionism, and the Constitution: 1845 workshop

The year is 1845 and slavery has grown to be an intractable and divisive issue in America. An escaped slave from Maryland named Frederick Douglass has just published an autobiography that is causing a sensation. Abolitionists are publicly calling for the dissolution of the United States, and anti-abolitionist riots have broken out. Slavery is popular, President Polk supports it, and the U.S. Constitution protects it by requiring the return of fugitive slaves to their owners. Are Americans accountable to the Constitution or to a higher law? Can abolitionists be suppressed before they destroy the Union? Frostburg State University invites you to travel to the past, and join the debate! Can you persuade America’s leading figures to embrace the rights and liberties on which our country was founded? Participate in a 2-day workshop introducing the Reacting to the Past pedagogical role playing game Frederick Douglass, Slavery, Abolitionism, and the Constitution: 1845, led by Dr. Mark Higbee, Professor of History at Eastern Michigan University on Saturday February 16, and Sunday February 17, 2013. All participants will receive a historical role to play and game materials including primary texts to help them prepare to play their role. Registration is free, and includes all meals and game materials.  Space will be limited to 30 participants. Please apply at www.frostburg.edu/fdworkshop/apply.   Applications submitted by December 21, 2012 will be assured full consideration.

Location:
Frostburg State University
101 Braddock Road
Frostburg, MD 21532
Contact Info:
Dr. Shoshana Brassfield
(301) 687-7391, srbrassfield@frostburg.edu

February 16, 2013 @ 2:00pm

Making Sense of the Civil War: Children's Civil War Crafts

Children are invited to craft a Civil War era "Clothespin doll."

Location:
Wicomico Public Library, Centre Branch
Centre at Salisbury
Salisbury, MD 21801
Contact Info:
(410) 546-5397

February 17, 2013 @ 9:30am

Frederick Douglass, Slavery, Abolitionism, and the Constitution: 1845 Workshop

The year is 1845 and slavery has grown to be an intractable and divisive issue in America. An escaped slave from Maryland named Frederick Douglass has just published an autobiography that is causing a sensation. Abolitionists are publicly calling for the dissolution of the United States, and anti-abolitionist riots have broken out. Slavery is popular, President Polk supports it, and the U.S. Constitution protects it by requiring the return of fugitive slaves to their owners. Are Americans accountable to the Constitution or to a higher law? Can abolitionists be suppressed before they destroy the Union? Frostburg State University invites you to travel to the past, and join the debate! Can you persuade America’s leading figures to embrace the rights and liberties on which our country was founded? Participate in a 2-day workshop introducing the Reacting to the Past pedagogical role playing game Frederick Douglass, Slavery, Abolitionism, and the Constitution: 1845, led by Dr. Mark Higbee, Professor of History at Eastern Michigan University on Saturday February 16, and Sunday February 17, 2013. All participants will receive a historical role to play and game materials including primary texts to help them prepare to play their role. Registration is free, and includes all meals and game materials. Space will be limited to 30 participants. Please apply at www.frostburg.edu/fdworkshop/apply. Applications submitted by December 21, 2012 will be assured full consideration.

Location:
Frostburg State University
101 Braddock Road
Frostburg, MD 21532
Contact Info:
Dr. Shoshana Brassfield
(301) 687-7391, srbrassfield@frostburg.edu

February 18, 2013 @ 7:00pm

The Musical Stories of Journeys

Listen to the ballads and songs that tell the stories of American journeys throughout our nation. Sailors and commercial fishermen travel the rivers and lakes singing shanties and ballads of longing for home. Political candidates go town to town, accompanied by bands and choruses performing their theme songs. Woody Guthrie sets the complaints of migrant workers to old, familiar tunes. The Civil War displaces soldiers into regions never seen, and of course the journeys of those who come from foreign lands to the US as the land of opportunity bring their native tunes with them, then learn to sing here of their new experiences. Cowboy, Indian, colonist, slave, traveling salesman, homesteader, dust bowl escapee, vaudeville performer, gold-digger, Vietnam refugee – there are songs for all of them. Dr. Hildebrand (whose own family traditions keep alive a song about "Aunt Becky" falling out of her bunk on a houseboat trip in Florida, 40 years ago) offers a mixture of mostly live musical selections, plus some recorded, accompanied by appropriate images. Adult and high school audiences.

Location:
College of Southern Maryland, La Plata
8730 Mitchell Road
La Plata, MD 20646
Contact Info:
Keith Hight
301-934-7827

February 19, 2013 @ 7:00pm

Civil War Book Discussion: "America's War Anthology" - Part Three

This is a five-part reading and discussion series, Making Sense of the Civil War, sponsored in part by the Maryland Humanities Council. Loaner copies of the book are available on a first-come, first-serve basis in the La Plata Campus library. Part three of the discussion series approaches the Battle of Shiloh, which occurred in April 1862, almost exactly a year after Fort Sumter and the secession of Virginia. The battle redefined the boundaries of the military conflict and thousands of men with little training and no experience in war were thrown against one another in days of inexpressible suffering and waste. The war was seen as a desperate, defiant effort by the Confederacy to stop the progress of the Union Army and Navy and shattered any fantasies people had that the war would be won easily by either side. Free.

Location:
Calvert Library, Prince Frederick - Meeting Room 1
850 Costley Way
Prince Frederick, MD 20678
Contact Info:
(301) 934-7606

February 19, 2013 @ 6:30pm

Making Sense of the Civil War Book Discussion

In commemoration of the 150th Anniversary, Making Sense of the American Civil War is a reading and discussion series that explores literary works about the Civil War. Participants will discuss readings from America's War: Talking About the Civil War & Emancipation on Their 150th Anniversaries,"an anthology by Edward L. Ayers.

Location:
Wicomico Public Library, Main Branch
122 South Division Street
Salisbury, MD 21801
Contact Info:
Mindy Mallette
(410) 749-3612 x 138

February 20, 2013 @ 6:30pm

Frederick Douglass: A Living History Presentation

One of the leaders of America's abolitionist movement, Frederick Douglass was born into slavery in Talbot County, Maryland in 1817. As a young house servant, he was taught to read and write. The brutality he experienced as a slave eventually led him to escape North and in 1845 he published his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. A noted speaker, Douglass influenced such important figures as Abraham Lincoln. Bill Grimmette is a living history interpreter, storyteller, actor, and motivational speaker who has performed throughout the United States and abroad. He has researched and performed the characters of W. E. B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Banneker, Estevanico, and Augustus Washington. He has appeared at the Smithsonian Institution and on National Public Radio. He has an M.A. in psychology from the Catholic University of America, and has done post-graduate work in education at George Mason University.

Location:
Harford County Public Library, Joppa Branch
655 Towne Center Drive
Joppa, MD 21085
Contact Info:
Karen Dull
410-612-2007

February 20, 2013 @ 1:00pm

Charles Ball: A Living History Presentation

Vincent Leggett portrays Charles Ball, a third-generation slave from Calvert County, Maryland who, after being sold to a trader in the deep South, escaped back to his home state. Upon his return to Maryland, he acted as a free man and fought in the War of 1812 on behalf of the United States in Commodore Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla. He took part in some of the most exciting battles in the Chesapeake, including the march from Benedict to Bladensburg and the defense of Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. Ball was discharged in 1814 and published an autobiography, The Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, in 1837. Ball’s story provides a lens through which we can examine the legacy of blacks in the Chesapeake, including their role in the War of 1812. Vincent Leggett is founder of the Blacks of the Chesapeake Foundation (1984) and the Chesapeake Ecology Center (2002). He has held positions at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anne Arundel Community College, Anne Arundel County and Baltimore City Public Schools, and he currently serves as Executive Director of the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis. Mr. Leggett is the author of The Chesapeake Bay Through Ebony Eyes (1999) and Blacks of the Chesapeake: An Integral Part of Maritime History (1997). He has also developed a curriculum on the Blacks of the Chesapeake, which is used by school systems in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and the District of Columbia.

Location:
Ulrich Recital Hall, Tawes Hall
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742
Contact Info:
Christine Garcia
301-314-7552

February 21, 2013 @ 6:00pm

Civil War Book Discussion

In commemoration of the 150th Anniversary, Making Sense of the American Civil War is a reading and discussion series that explores literary works about the Civil War. Copies of the selected texts are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Featured books include "March" by Geraldine Brooks and "Imagining War" from "America's War Anthology." To register for this free program, contact Ranger Jim Bailey at jim_bailey@nps.gov or call 410-962-4290 Ext. 206.

Location:
Hampton National Historic Shrine
535 Hampton Lane
Towson, MD 21286
Contact Info:
Ranger Jim Bailey
(410) 962-4290 ext 206 or email jim_bailey@nps.gov

February 23, 2013 @ 2:00pm

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights

A dynamic project in which a dozen senior citizens from the Baltimore area tell and perform personal stories of their involvement in the struggle for civil rights.

Location:
Enoch Pratt Free Library, Central Branch
400 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
Contact Info:
Sandra Abbott
(410) 455-3188 or visit www.foralltheworldtohear.org

February 24, 2013 @ 2:00pm

Oysters and People: Panel Discussion

Join the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum for a discussion series focused on the Maryland Oyster. This dialogue focuses on the social history of oyster production and conservation, addressing the long-term interactions between oysters and the Bay's inhabitants. The panel discussion includes historian Christine Keiner, a professor in the Public Policy Department at Rochester Institute of Technology who is a widely acknowledged authority on the social history of oystering in Maryland waters, The Aquaculture Field Operations Manager from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, as well as a folklorist and historian engaged in community research.

Location:
Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum
213 North Talbot Street
St. Michaels, MD 21663
Contact Info:
Robert Forloney or Michelle Zacks
(410) 745-2916

February 25, 2013 @ 7:00pm

Film: Home

Film with panel and world cafe discussion

Location:
Allegany College of Maryland
12401 Willowbrook Road
Cumberland, MD 21502
Contact Info:
Mike Snyder
(240) 522-1479

February 26, 2013 @ 1:00pm

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Living History Presentation

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was an icon of the civil rights movement, preaching nonviolence in the struggle for racial equality. A prime mover of the Montgomery bus boycott, the first president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and closing speaker in the historic 1963 March on Washington, King is one of the most revered figures in American history. He was the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and his achievements had an impact worldwide. Bill Grimmette is a living history interpreter, storyteller, actor, and motivational speaker who has performed throughout the United States and abroad. He has researched and performed the characters of W. E. B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Banneker, Estevanico, and Augustus Washington. He has appeared at the Smithsonian Institution and on National Public Radio. He has an M.A. in psychology from the Catholic University of America, and has done post-graduate work in education at George Mason University.

Location:
Arnold Senior Activity Center
44 Church Road
Arnold, MD 21012
Contact Info:
Suzie Antkowiak
410-222-1922

February 26, 2013 @ 2:00pm

Soldier's Life in Camp: Let's Talk About It! Civil War Reading & Discussion

In commemoration of the 150th Anniversary, Making Sense of the American Civil War is a reading and discussion series that explores literary works about the Civil War. A uniformed Union Soldier (Mike Daily) talks to participants about life in a Civil War encampment and plays some music of the period on his banjo.

Location:
Wicomico Public Library, Pittsville Branch
34372 Old Coean City Road
Pittsville, MD 21850
Contact Info:
Kerry O'Donnell
(410) 835-2353

February 26, 2013 @ 7:00pm

Medicine in the Civil War

In commemoration of the 150th Anniversary, Making Sense of the American Civil War is a reading and discussion series that explores literary works about the Civil War. Dr. Bill Campbell of Salisbury University speaks on medicine and the Battlefield triage during the Civil War.

Location:
Wicomico Public Library, Main Branch
122 South Division Street
Salisbury, MD 21801
Contact Info:
Mindy Mallette
(410) 749-3612 x 138

February 27, 2013 @ 12:30pm

Charles Ball: A Living History Presentation

Vincent Leggett portrays Charles Ball, a third-generation slave from Calvert County, Maryland who, after being sold to a trader in the deep South, escaped back to his home state. Upon his return to Maryland, he acted as a free man and fought in the War of 1812 on behalf of the United States in Commodore Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla. He took part in some of the most exciting battles in the Chesapeake, including the march from Benedict to Bladensburg and the defense of Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. Ball was discharged in 1814 and published an autobiography, The Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, in 1837. Ball’s story provides a lens through which we can examine the legacy of blacks in the Chesapeake, including their role in the War of 1812.

Location:
Annapolis Senior Activity Senior
119 South Villa Avenue
Annapolis, MD 21401
Contact Info:
Becky Batta
410-222-1818